Tag Archives: John Boehner

Perspectives on last week’s debt debate: two sides of the same coin

How the “left” sees the recent debt ceiling debate/crisis…

And how the “right” sees it…

Is it any surprise that the politicians had a hard time finding a middle ground? They don’t see eye to eye on what the problem is in the first place.

Also, what’s with this “super committee” that’s lacking any deficit hawks? Or Rep. Jason Chaffetz, for that matter? No, seriously. Why is he not on it.

In the meantime, Utah has its act together. Wonder if the feds might take a page from our book?

(h/t to Geeks are Sexy)

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In which I express mock surprise at how well it pays to work for the President of the United States

Evidently, these salary increases are not connected to performance.

Gawker tells the story:

The White House says that many of those positions are considered nonpolitical jobs that come with their own pay schedules, and that what matters is that the total budget and average salary are decreasing slightly. But that doesn’t change the fact that White House staffers who stick it out are being rewarded, on average, for their continued service at a rate that far outstrips how the average white-collar worker is doing. The rhetoric behind the White House salary freeze was about making sure that the people engaged in leading the nation out of its economic mess share a sense of what American workers are experiencing. Unless roughly half of American workers saw their paychecks go up by an average of 8% last year (hint—they didn’t), that’s not the case.

Shocker.

Government revenues are down, but employee salaries are up. Well, not every employee’s salary–just those who work in the President’s staff. If this were a business (which it is not, and no, I’m not saying government should be run like a business), this would be the equivalent of the CEO giving his executives big raises while company revenues are falling.

In other words:

Lest you think that’s a partisan sentiment:

 

I’d love to hear what those highly paid special and deputy assistants advise on that one.

PS: I’m not opposed to government workers receiving compensation commensurate with their qualifications, job description, and market demand. However, I do oppose policies that have done little but strap us with greater spending liabilities with little to no effect on our revenues.

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Libya: Members of Congress Challenging Constitutionality of Military Action

(en) Libya Location (he) מיקום לוב

Image via Wikipedia

It’s the American way. Got a problem? Take it to court.

Even if that problem is military action in Libya.

While Rep. Boehner is taking a more diplomatic tact by sending a letter to President Obama seeking clarification on Libya, others have had enough and are challenging him in federal court.

Is our continued military action in Libya legal? That is the question Professor Jonathon Turley, representing ten Members of Congress, is asking the court to decide.

This is an action for injunctive and declaratory relief. In addition to challenging the circumvention of express constitutional language, it will also challenge arguments that no one (including members of Congress) has “standing” to submit this question to judicial review. These members will ask the federal district court for review of the constitutional question and for recognition that the Constitution must allow for judicial review of claims of undeclared wars under Article I.

via Members of Congress Challenge Libyan War in Federal Court « JONATHAN TURLEY.

The Congressional members in the suit are from both parties and include Representatives Roscoe Bartlett (R., Md); Dan Burton (R., Ind.); Mike Capuano (D., Mass.); Howard Coble (R., N.C.); John Conyers (D., Mich.); John J. Duncan (R., Tenn.); Tim Johnson (R., Ill.); Walter Jones (R., N.C.); Dennis Kucinich (D., Ohio); and Ron Paul (R., Tx).

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While we bomb Libya, is a violation of the War Powers Resolution on the horizon?

(en) Libya Location (he) מיקום לוב

Image via Wikipedia

In case you’ve forgotten, we are still bombing Libya.

Yesterday, Rep. John Boehner sent a letter to President Obama reminding him that the time has arrived–legally speaking–to obtain Congressional approval for further military action in the North African country.

Five days from now, our country will reach the 90-day mark from the notification to Congress regarding the commencement of the military operation in Libya, which began on March 18, 2011.  On June 3, 2011, the House passed a resolution which, among other provisions, made clear that the Administration has not asked for, nor received, Congressional authorization of the mission in Libya.  Therefore, it would appear that in five days, the Administration will be in violation of the War Powers Resolution unless it asks for and receives authorization from Congress or withdraws all U.S. troops and resources from the mission.

via Boehner warns Obama that Libya will violate war powers | Susan Ferrechio | Beltway Confidential | Washington Examiner.

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“Do what I say (pass my budget), not what I do (ignore your budget).”

Barack Obama - Caricature

President Barack Obama, Adult-in-Chief. Image by DonkeyHotey via Flickr

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT…

Our federal government is on the verge of shutting down. And President Obama wants Congressional Republicans to do what he says (pass his budget), not what he does (ignore their budget).

The United States government doesn’t have a budget for fiscal year 2011, yet. If it doesn’t pass one by Friday, the government will shut down. This means, as others have pointed out, that we may see something like what happened in 1995 and 1996:

[I]t actually cost the government money in back wages, lost revenue from shut-down national parks and the local economies and businesses surrounding those parks. Not all government workers go on a mandatory vacation, either. Essential staff still stay on duty – FBI and TSA workers, VA hospitals and military bases stay open, as would the US Postal Service, the prez and his employees and all members of Congress.

So, naturally,with a shutdown threatening due to Congress’ and the President’s inability to work out a compromise, what do our elected leaders do? Get down to the thumb tacks, pound out a compromise that moves our country on the path to get out of debt, and works to lighten the load on Americans?

Nope. They trade insults.

President Barack Obama on Tuesday called on congressional leaders – especially Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) – to act like “grown-ups” and avert a government shutdown after they made no apparent progress in reaching a budget agreement at a White House meeting earlier in the day.

In response, Congressional Republicans said that they were going to take their toys and go home…

Oh, wait. No they didn’t. Rather, they released a plan to cut $6.2 trillion out of the budget over the next four years, including reducing the deficit by $4.4 trillion, a number three times the Administration’s (and, consequently, the amount that the Administration has added to the bottom line over the last few years).

Naturally, with Rep.Paul Ryan wonkishly talking policy and throwing around statistics, numbers, and budgets that save money, maintain retirement benefits, decrease our federal deficit, and, well, make sense, an insult was the best the President could come up with on the spur of the moment. After all, the upstart Congressman from Wisconsin is making him look bad.

Ironically, Rep. Ryan’s plan isn’t even considered to be that great. It’s just better than the President’s.

Politics is the realm of the possible, blah blah. Only in a government situation where we’re facing a shutdown on Friday and a debt limit squeeze around the same time – after a decade of completely bipartisan raids on fiscal sanity – can Ryan’s plan be considered the realistic plan.

It’s just better than the alternative.

From there, and by “there” I mean “a plan that cuts the deficit and salvages the future for our children,” the President decided to pull out the big guns: he accused the Republicans of partisanship because they want to include in the budget cuts cutting off funding for a few of the Golden Calves of the political left (Planned Parenthood, EPA, etc).

We can debate abortion and environmental regulation later. Right now, if we don’t get our fiscal house in order, it may not matter whether Planned Parenthood and the EPA keep federal handouts or funding, because entitlements are going to take over the budget completely.

MEANWHILE, in other news, the adults are busy coordinating President Obama’s reelection campaign…

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