Tag Archives: President

First Iowa, and now the worst ratings ever.

Last week, Republicans decided to “give Iowa a try.” Then T-paw, first man into the race for President, became the first man out of the race (unless you count this dufus). Then, with a nary a whimper (and a jet black bus), the President kicked off what Mitt Romney called the “Magical Misery Tour,” a bus tour of mid-west swing states.

“During his Magical Misery bus tour this week, it is unlikely President Obama will speak with unemployed Americans, to near-bankrupt business owners, or to families struggling to survive in this economy,” the campaign said in a statement released prior to Obama’s arrival in Minnesota Monday.

I don’t know about that…last I checked, the President wasn’t opposed to having a beer with a couple of regular guys.

Besides, President Obama knows what it looks like to have unemployment staring him in the face. It’s happening to him now.

Yep. It’s President Obama’s worst approval rating since his inauguration. Even with the election more than a year away, he can’t be relishing these kind of ratings. I’m not sure if there’s just a lot of news about the GOP due to Iowa (a debate, a straw poll, a Texan entering the race, and, of course, that butter statue) or if the country is really looking for someone to blame, but President Obama is taking a part of the hit (the economy is swallowing the rest of the malaise).

On the other hand, there’s a lot of politics between now  and the only poll that matters, and President Obama is not idiot. I suspect he’s ready for the next fourteen and a half months.

Grab yourself a cold one, put on your most comfortable shoes, and get ready: it’s going to be a magical ride, misery or not.

 (h/t Gallup and DBKP)

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In case you didn’t know…now you do: How laws are made.

In which I express mock surprise at how well it pays to work for the President of the United States

Evidently, these salary increases are not connected to performance.

Gawker tells the story:

The White House says that many of those positions are considered nonpolitical jobs that come with their own pay schedules, and that what matters is that the total budget and average salary are decreasing slightly. But that doesn’t change the fact that White House staffers who stick it out are being rewarded, on average, for their continued service at a rate that far outstrips how the average white-collar worker is doing. The rhetoric behind the White House salary freeze was about making sure that the people engaged in leading the nation out of its economic mess share a sense of what American workers are experiencing. Unless roughly half of American workers saw their paychecks go up by an average of 8% last year (hint—they didn’t), that’s not the case.

Shocker.

Government revenues are down, but employee salaries are up. Well, not every employee’s salary–just those who work in the President’s staff. If this were a business (which it is not, and no, I’m not saying government should be run like a business), this would be the equivalent of the CEO giving his executives big raises while company revenues are falling.

In other words:

Lest you think that’s a partisan sentiment:

 

I’d love to hear what those highly paid special and deputy assistants advise on that one.

PS: I’m not opposed to government workers receiving compensation commensurate with their qualifications, job description, and market demand. However, I do oppose policies that have done little but strap us with greater spending liabilities with little to no effect on our revenues.

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A false dilemma: Support a Dictator, or Support Oppressed People…How about instead support the “Constitution, limited government, limited executive power to kill people, [and] limited executive power to put our armed forces at risk…”

"Duh. It's for the children. Now don't ask any more questions."

When in doubt of winning a debate, re-frame it as a false dilemma.

In other words, make it impossible for people to choose anything but your side. Never mind if it means ignoring the Constitution or killing people, just to start.

It takes a lot of restraint to put things in their fair perspective. Evidently, Secretary Clinton does not have that restraint. Continue reading

Andrew Jackson on Nullification

Portrait of Andrew Jackson, the seventh presid...

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I ran across an interesting piece of political history this weekend. With nullification occasionally making the news across the country, I thought it was interesting to see how the executive responded to it in one of its first appearances, during the Administration of Andrew Jackson.

THE Constitution of the United States forms a government, not a league, and whether it be formed by compact between the States, or in any other manner, its character is same. It is a government in which all the people are represented which operates directly upon the people individually not upon the States they retained all the power they did grant. But each State having expressly parted with so powers as to constitute jointly with the other States a single Nation cannot from that period possess any right to secede because such secession does not break a league but destroys unity of a Nation and any injury to that unity is not only breach which would result from the contravention of a compact but is an offense against the whole Union.[…]

The laws of the United States must be executed. I have no discretionary power on the subject–my duty is emphatically pronounced in the Constitution. Those who told you that you might peaceably prevent their execution deceived you–they could not have been deceived themselves.

Andrew Jackson, on nullification attempts in South Carolina.